Saturday, October 04, 2008

When a house of prayer becomes a house of beer . . .

I was disappointed to see that a church I pass on my way to work every morning was just purchased by a bar. The Red Salamander, a business for those seeking homebrew, brewing supplies and cigars, just relocated to the former Covenant Christian Reformed Church building.

I do not criticize moderate drinking. The Bible clearly condemns drunkenness, but the occasional brew, if done with self-control, is alright by me. Nevertheless, it saddens me that a church, which is supposed to bring life, would sell its building to a tavern, which for some, leads down a different path.

Am I being melodramatic?

UPDATE: MIKEV writes that the church was not aware that it was being sold to a pub. Apparently the law does not require commercial real estate transactions to disclose the use for which the building will be used. Looks like there are no winners in this one. Except maybe the beer drinkers, that is.

7 comments:

randy burghdoff said...

I agree, it is sad.

James Pahl said...

Makes me think of the classic song "The First Baptist Bar and Grill"

I think we don't know enough about the situation. I went to their website to see what happened but it appears to be down.

Maybe they moved into another building. Maybe they found another use for their money and rent for their weekly gathering like our brethren at Meridian Christian Church. Maybe they got raptured...well ok maybe not.

I know you don't need me to tell you that the people are more important than the building will ever be, so if this was the best choice for that body of Christians to make then that should be ok with us, right? Of course with an inoperative website and no means to find out we may never know!

Mike Waugh said...

I'd say that it's sort of sad on a symbolic level. However, it may be an indication that the church that used to worship there wasn't doing too well in the "bringing life" department anyway?

I suppose one could argue that it's more of a hindrance to the kingdom to have a lifeless church building on the corner than a hip and trendy bar. At least with the bar, you get what's advertised (and all the other stuff that they don't advertise).

Randy Burghdoff said...

I think it's sad that a church would be willing to sell their building knowing that it would become a bar.

To me it sends the signal that receiving money for the building was more important than considering what was going to take its place.

The reason why I don't say that it's not a big deal is because I know that if it wasn't a bar but a strip club, an adult entertainment outlet, or an abortion clinic everyone would be upset.

Drinking in moderation may be permissible and nothing would be better than another church taking that spot, but I feel that anything that invites people to a world of sin that takes the place of a church.. is a sad day.

MIKEV said...

Be carefull of rushing to judgement. A commercial real estate purchaser does not need to disclose his plans for the property. This church WAS NOT sold for use of a tavern and I resent the assumption that Christian brothers would knowingly sell their church building where they have worshipped for over 20 years for a pub.

Frank Weller said...

I stand corrected, MIKEV. Please read the ammended post . . .

Frank Weller said...
This comment has been removed by the author.